HomeNewsArticle Display

UNL Weather Camp visits 557th WW

Students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp pose for a group photo with 557th Weather Wing staff in the wing’s atrium June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The students visited the wing as part of a career camp for high school students interested in meteorology. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

Students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp pose for a group photo with 557th Weather Wing staff in the wing’s atrium June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The students visited the wing as part of a career camp for high school students interested in meteorology. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jeff Williams, 557th Weather Wing wing inspection team manager, gives students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp a weather wing mission brief June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The campers toured the building and learned about career opportunities in Air Force Weather. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jeff Williams, 557th Weather Wing wing inspection team manager, gives students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp a weather wing mission brief June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The campers toured the building and learned about career opportunities in Air Force Weather. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Miller, 557th Weather Wing commander’s action group chief, look at an operational linescan system (OLS) from a defense meteorological satellite with students from a University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp during a tour of the weather wing June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The OLS is used on meteorological satellites to view cloud cover using visible and infrared light. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Miller, 557th Weather Wing commander’s action group chief, look at an operational linescan system (OLS) from a defense meteorological satellite with students from a University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp during a tour of the weather wing June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The OLS is used on meteorological satellites to view cloud cover using visible and infrared light. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Miller, 557th Weather Wing (WW) commander’s action group chief, describes opportunities in Air Force Weather to students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp during a tour of the 557th WW June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Students also viewed the wing’s historical artifacts before touring the wing’s Space Weather Operations Center and High Performance Computer Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Miller, 557th Weather Wing (WW) commander’s action group chief, describes opportunities in Air Force Weather to students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Weather Camp during a tour of the 557th WW June 12, 2018, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Students also viewed the wing’s historical artifacts before touring the wing’s Space Weather Operations Center and High Performance Computer Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Shirk)

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. --

High school students interested in meteorology visited the 557th Weather Wing as part of the National Weather Camp program June 12, 2018, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.

The students, who have a desire to pursue careers in weather, are in grades 10 - 12 from high schools across the United States.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln hosts one of the camps in locations around Nebraska.

Dr. Ken Dewey, UNL professor of climatology and weather camp director, said that the students enjoyed being able to share their enthusiasm for weather with people who share the same interests.

“These students do not have a group to join in high school to get to know other students interested in weather science,” Dewey said. “There are clubs and activities for many interests, but nothing that is directly related to a career in meteorology. As a result these students are thrilled to be in a group of others at weather camp who have the same level of interest in weather.”

During their visit, students received a briefing on the wing’s missions, viewed artifacts in the atrium and toured the Space Weather Operations Center and High Performance Computer Center. The students also learned about career opportunities in Air Force Weather.

“The UNL Weather Camp is 7-years-old, and we have been bringing the students to the weather wing to show them a career path both within the Air Force as commissioned officers and as a civilian forecasters,” Dewey said. “Most of them didn't know about the high school junior ROTC program or the college level ROTC program and several students told us on the way home that is something of interest to them.”

The 557th WW is a popular career destination for students and graduates from UNL meteorological programs. The weather wing hires students often as interns which sometimes lead to permanent positions after graduation.

“We currently have several UNL meteorology graduates working as civilians at the weather wing,” Dewey said, “and in our previous visits there, we have also encountered former UNL graduates working there as commissioned officers,”.

After the camp had concluded many students said visiting the 557th WW was their favorite activity, Dewey reported.